P3


 
HomePortalCalendarFAQSearchMemberlistUsergroupsRegisterLog in

Share | 
 

 Magical Creatures

Go down 
AuthorMessage
Paityn Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 140
Join date : 2009-11-30

PostSubject: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:33 am

Muses

The Muses in Greek mythology, poetry, and literature are the goddesses or spirits who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. They were considered the source of the knowledge, related orally for centuries in the ancient culture, that was contained in poetic lyrics and myths. Originally said to be three in number, by the Classical times of the 400s BC, their number had grown and become set at nine goddesses who embody the arts and inspire the creation process with their graces through remembered and improvised song and stage, writing, traditional music, and dance.

There are nine of them often referred to as the daughters of Apollo. Though really they were the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne, goddess of Memory. The Muses, when taken together, form a complete picture of the subjects proper to poetic art, the association of specific Muses with specific art forms is a later innovation. The Muses were not assigned standardized divisions of poetry with which they are now identified until late Hellenistic times.

The Nine Muses
Calliope The muse of Epic Poetry
Clio The muse of History
Erato The muse of Lyric Poetry
Euterpe The muse of Music
Melpomene The muse of Tragedy
Polyhymnia The muse of Choral Poetry
Terpsichore The muse of music
Thalia The muse of Comedy
Urania The muse of Astronomy
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Paityn Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 140
Join date : 2009-11-30

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:39 am

Cupids

Cupids are a race of magical beings, associated with love. They are the messengers of the God Eros who is the original cupid. They help guide people towards love while trying to not interfere with Free Will.

Most of their powers are derived from a ring except their teleportation.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Wyatt Matthew Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 141
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 27
Location : Batesburg-Leesville

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:54 am

Elves


An elf (plural elves) is a being of Germanic mythology. The elves were originally thought of as a race of divine or semi-divine beings (wights, vættir) endowed with magical powers, which they use both for the benefit and the injury of mankind. In pre-Christian mythology, they appear to have been divided into light elves and dark elves, difficult to delineate from the Æsir (gods) on one hand and the dvergar (dwarves) on the other.

In early modern and modern folklore, they become associated with the fairies of Romance folklore and assume a diminutive size, often living underground in hills or rocks, or in wells and springs. 19th-century Romanticism attempted to restore them to full stature, often depicting them as youthful-seeming men and women of great beauty. From their depiction in Romanticism, elves entered the 20th-century high fantasy genre in the wake of the publications of J.R.R. Tolkien, especially the posthumous publication of his Silmarillion where Tolkien's treatment of the relation of light elves, dark elves, black elves and dwarves in Norse mythology is made explicit. Popular culture in the Anglosphere at the same time with Santa Claus and his helpers preserves a direct continuation of early modern folklore.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Wyatt Matthew Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 141
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 27
Location : Batesburg-Leesville

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:57 am

Unicorn


A unicorn (from Latin unus 'one' and cornu 'horn') is a mythological creature. Though the modern popular image of the unicorn is sometimes that of a horse differing only in the horn on its forehead, the traditional unicorn also has a billy-goat beard, a lion's tail, and cloven hooves—these distinguish it from a horse. Marianna Mayer has observed (The Unicorn and the Lake), "The unicorn is the only fabulous beast that does not seem to have been conceived out of human fears. In even the earliest references he is fierce yet good, selfless yet solitary, but always mysteriously beautiful. He could be captured only by unfair means, and his single horn was said to neutralize poison and be a powerful source of good magic.


Last edited by Wyatt Matthew Halliwell on Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:33 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Wyatt Matthew Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 141
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 27
Location : Batesburg-Leesville

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 12:59 am

Goblins

A goblin is a legendary evil or mischievous creature described as a grotesquely disfigured or gnome-like phantom that may range in height from that of a dwarf to that of a human. They are attributed with various (sometimes conflicting) abilities, temperaments and appearances depending on the story and country of origin. In some cases, goblins have been classified as constantly annoying little creatures somewhat related to the brownie and gnome.

Goblins can come in any colour but are mainly depicted as green or brown. While they are generally considered crabby, very rarely a story or movie will feature kind goblins
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Paige Matthews
Admin
avatar

Posts : 221
Join date : 2009-05-03

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:12 am

Nymphs

A nymph in Greek mythology is a female spirit typically associated with a particular location or landform. Other nymphs, always in the shape of young nubile maidens, were part of the retinue of a god, such as Dionysus, Hermes, or Pan, or a goddess, generally Artemis. Nymphs were the frequent target of satyrs. They live in mountains and groves, by springs and rivers, also in trees and in valleys and cool grottoes. They are frequently associated with the superior divinities: the huntress Artemis; the prophetic Apollo; the reveller and god of wine, Dionysus; and rustic gods such as Pan and Hermes.

Land nymphs
Alseids (glens, groves)
Auloniads (pastures)
Hesperides (nymphs of the west, daughters of Atlas)
Aegle ("dazzling light")
Arethusa
Erytheia (or Eratheis)
Hesperia (or Hispereia)
Leimakids (meadows)
Minthe (mint)
Napaeae (mountain valleys, glens)
Oreads (mountains, grottoes)
Wood nymphs
Dryads (trees)
Hamadryads (oak tree and others)
Epimeliad (apple tree)
Leuce (white poplar tree)
Meliae (manna-ash tree)
Water nymphs ("Ephydriads")
Helead (fen)
Maia (partner of Zeus and mother of Hermes)
Naiads (usually fresh water)
Crinaeae (fountains)
Eleionomae (marshes)
Hyades (rain)
Limnades or Limnatides (lakes)
Pegaeae (springs)
Potameides (rivers)
Corycian Nymphs (Corycian Cave)
Nereids (daughters of Nereus, the Mediterranean Sea)
Oceanids (daughters of Oceanus and Tethys, any water, usually salty)
Other nymphs
Lampades (underworld)
The Muses
Nephelae (clouds)
Pleiades (daughters of Atlas and constellation)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Back to top Go down
View user profile http://pthree.darkbb.com
Wyatt Matthew Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 141
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 27
Location : Batesburg-Leesville

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:16 am

Griffin

The griffin is a legendary creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. As the lion was traditionally considered the king of the beasts and the eagle was the king of the birds, the griffin was thought to be an especially powerful and majestic creature. Griffins are normally known for guarding treasure.[1] In antiquity it was a symbol of divine power and a guardian of the divine.[2]

Most contemporary illustrations give Griffin legs like a eagle's with talons, although in some older illustrations it has a lion's forelimbs; it generally has a lion's hindquarters. Its eagle's head is conventionally given prominent ears; these are sometimes described as the lion's ears, but are often elongated (more like a horse's), and are sometimes feathered.

Infrequently, a griffin is portrayed without wings (or a wingless eagle-headed lion is identified as a griffin); in 15th-century and later heraldry such a beast may be called an alce or a keythong. In heraldry, a griffin always has forelegs like an eagle's; the beast with forelimbs like a lion's forelegs was distinguished by perhaps only one English herald of later heraldry as the opinicus. The modern generalist calls it the lion-griffin, as for example, Robin Lane Fox, in Alexander the Great, 1973:31 and notes p. 506, who remarks a lion-griffin attacking a stag in a pebble mosaic at Pella, perhaps as an emblem of the kingdom of Macedon or a personal one of Alexander's successor Antipater.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Wyatt Matthew Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 141
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 27
Location : Batesburg-Leesville

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:30 am

Dragons

Dragons are legendary creatures, typically with serpentine or otherwise reptilian traits, that feature in the myths of worldwide cultures.

The two most familiar interpretations of dragons are European dragons, derived from various European folk traditions, and the unrelated Oriental dragons, such as the Chinese dragon (lóng 龍 or 龙). The English word "dragon" derives from Greek δράκων (drákōn), "dragon, serpent of huge size, water-snake", which probably comes from the verb δρακεῖν (drakeîn) "to see clearly".
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Wyatt Matthew Halliwell

avatar

Posts : 141
Join date : 2009-05-20
Age : 27
Location : Batesburg-Leesville

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 1:40 am

Gargoyle

In architecture, a gargoyle is a carved stone grotesque with a spout designed to convey water from a roof and away from the side of a building

The term originates from the French gargouille, originally "throat" or "gullet";[1] cf. Latin gurgulio, gula, and similar words derived from the root gar, "to swallow", which represented the gurgling sound of water (e.g., Spanish garganta, "throat"; Spanish gárgola, "gargoyle").

A chimera, or a grotesque figure, is a sculpture that does not work as a waterspout and serves only an ornamental or artistic function. These are also usually called gargoyles in layman's terminology,[1] although the field of architecture usually preserves the distinction between gargoyles (functional waterspouts) and non-waterspout grotesques.

Gargoyles are said to scare off and protect from any evil or harmful spirits.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Leo Wyatt

avatar

Posts : 26
Join date : 2009-12-03
Age : 94

PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   Fri Dec 04, 2009 6:23 pm

Leprechauns

The name leprechaun is derived from the old Irish word luchorpan which means "little body."
A leprechaun is an Irish fairy taking the appearance of a miniature old man, about 2 feet tall. They are known to live in remote places.

All leprechauns possesses a hidden crock of gold, which they use to bring either good luck or bad luck to keep the scale of Good and Evil form tipping on either side.
Back to top Go down
View user profile
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Magical Creatures   

Back to top Go down
 
Magical Creatures
Back to top 
Page 1 of 1
 Similar topics
-
» Grayson, Troy
» Care of Magical Creatures Professor's Office/Room
» Care of Magical creatures Homework
» Aya's magical and sometimes sad poems
» Creatures Of The Night

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
P3 :: Welcome :: The Book of Shadows-
Jump to: